Techniques

Techniques Menu:


2-Step Stampin’

How-to:

  1. Stamp the base image.
  2. Position and stamp the overlay or adjoining image.

Tips:

  1. Use lighter ink for the base image and darker ink for the overlying image.
  2. Two-Step Stampin’ doesn’t have to use two different ink colors. Try the repetitive stamping technique for multiple lighter shades from one ink pad.
  3. Mount your Two-Step stamps close to the edge of the wood. When you stamp, you will be able to see the leading edge of the rubber for better alignment.
  4. Use a Stamp-a-ma-jig for perfect alignment!

(Techniques courtesy of Stampin’ Up http://www.stampinup.com)

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Bleaching


How-to:

just stamp it!

The simplest way to create this effect is to treat the bleach like ink for your rubber  stamps. One easy way  is to create a “stamp pad” by saturating a
folded paper towel with a little bleach. “Ink”  your stamp using the bleach “pad” and  stamp the image onto your card stock. Then  sit back and watch the magic as the bleach lifts the image out of the background. The result is a wonderful contrast of dark and light.

just stamp it . . . twice!

You can create beautiful shadow effects by using both bleach and a tone-ontone duo of ink and card stock. This is most effective when you use lighter hues, such as More Mustard or Bashful Blue. To create a shadow for the lighter image, first stamp your image in More Mustard ink on More
Mustard card stock, and then stamp the same image using bleach. The multiple
shades you get from the card stock, ink, and bleach give the card a multidimensional feel.

Tips:

Q: Is bleaching safe for scrapbooks?

A: According to our paper manufacturer, “Bleaching with standard household bleach should not affect the pH of the paper because the bleach is just slightly more alkaline (alkaline: opposite side of the pH scale than acid) than our paper. However, bleaching can weaken the fiber of the paper somewhat.”

Bleaching tips:

  • Apply bleach to a dried-out blender pen for bleaching inside an image.
  • Use a plastic sponge bottle (traditionally used for moistening postage stamps) filled with bleach to apply the bleach directly on your stamp.

(Techniques courtesy of Stampin’ Up http://www.stampinup.com)

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Chalking with Stampin’ Pastels


How to:

  1. Apply pastel color to your card stock or paper with a sponge-tip applicator, cotton swab, sponge dauber, stiff paintbrush, or blender pen.
  2. Blend the colors as desired with the applicators or a blender pen.
  3. Use a matte fixative to seal chalks, if desired.

Tips:

  1. To avoid smearing, gently dab the chalk rather than rubbing it across the image.
  2. Don’t worry if your Stampin’ Pastels break. That is normal and doesn’t affect use.

(Techniques courtesy of Stampin’ Up http://www.stampinup.com)

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Cardstock Cutting

So you have your paper, now what? Cutting cardstock surely isn’t brain surgery, its just important that you know the correct measurements and then things are much easier! Here’s a little guide to help you with 3 different sizes of cards you can make from a sheet of 8.5×11″ cardstock!

card-cutting

Click for a Full-size version.

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Markers



Multiple Colors How-To:

  1. Use a marker to apply color to the stamp. Ink only the part of the stamp you need.
  2. Add other colors if desired.
  3. “Breathe” onto the inked image to remoisten the ink before stamping onto paper.

Tip:

  1. For a more muted, watercolor look, spray a fine mist of water on the stamp instead of breathing on it.

Omitting with Markers How-to:

  1. To omit a certain part of a stamp image, use a marker to apply ink only to the desired parts of the image.
  2. “Breathe” on the inked image to re-moisten the ink before stamping onto paper.

Tip:

  1. Use a Stamp-a-ma-jig stamp positioner if you want to perfectly align the overlay image.

(Techniques courtesy of Stampin’ Up http://www.stampinup.com)

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Rock ‘n Roll


How to:

  1. Ink Stamp on light-colored ink pad.
  2. Press edges of stamp in a rolling motion on darker ink pad, being careful not to ink the center of the stamp.

Tips:

  1. Always use the lightest colored ink first to avoid getting dark ink on your light ink pad.
  2. This technique works best when using a bold stamp image.

(Techniques courtesy of Stampin’ Up http://www.stampinup.com)

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Watercoloring

Directions:

1) Dip the tip of a blender pen on to the corner of a Stampin’ Pastel, then apply color to the stamped image.

OR

2) Brush the tip of a blender pen, Aqua Painter, or wet watercolor brush directly on the tip of a Watercolor Wonder Crayon, then apply color to the stamped image.

OR

3) Outline a section of the stamped image with a Watercolor Wonder Crayon or Watercolor Pencil, then use a blender pen, Aqua Painter, or wet watercolor brush to pull color where desired.

OR

4) Press the closed lid of a Classic Stampin’ Pad down against the inked pad, then open the lid, creating a small pool of color in the lid. Use a blender pen or damp watercolor brush to lift the ink from the lid and apply.

Poinsettia image watercolored using ink pads and Aqua Painter

Tips:

1) For more saturated colors, watercolor with Classic ink refills.

2) While there are several ways to watercolor, each method has its advantages and unique looks.

3) For more vibrant color and shading with watercolor pencils, color your artwork again while the card stock is still wet.

4) You can also make a palette by scribbling with different colors of Watercolor Wonder Crayons or Watercolor Pencils on a piece of scratch paper or a placon box. Pick up the color from the palette with a damp watercolor brush or blender pen.

5) To keep your watercolor brush supple and reduce fanning bristles, run your watercolor brush across a bar of soap a couple of times before storing.
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